5.09.2015

DIY Sea Salt Spray + Styling Tips for Volume

Hey hey hey! This week I'm sharing with you a guys a simple recipe for a Sea Salt Spray. This spray adds texture to the hair and enhances curls, just like swimming in the ocean does. It's not recommended to be used daily though, as it can be slightly drying. But maybe once a week it's great for a curl boost!

Recipe:
2/3 cup water
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 tablespooon leave in conditioner (can be substituted with aloe vera or oil)

Things You'll Need:
Plastic spray bottle


1. Heat water in microwave for 30 seconds (to warm, not boiling).
2. Mix in salt and leave in conditioner.
3. Pour into spray bottle and shake it up. Voila!

For styling tips on how to get more voluminous, bigger hair please watch the new video:


If you need to learn how to Plop your Hair:


How to Diffuse Curly Hair (Pixiecurl Method):


Bonus: Curly Root Clipping via Devacurl:
*Note: You don't have to purchase the devaclips. Just buy the same kind from Sally's Beauty!

5.02.2015

Summer Hair Care Changes & Avoiding Chlorine and Sun Damage

Hey loves! In this post I'll be laying out the different steps I take to change my routine when the summer starts to roll around as well as how to protect your hair from the sun and chlorine. I get lots of questions about this so I hope it is helpful. :)



Routine Changes

For reference I have spent most of my life living in the southern US, so I spent summers in hot and humid places. When the weather starts to get a bit warmer, we all know we need some extra help from our hair products to help prevent frizz and keep our hair moisturized. I use harder hold gels and frizz reducing products. One of my favorite frizz reducers is Curly Hair Solutions Curl Keeper, which is a serum that's awesome for cutting frizz when layered under gel. If I can't get my hands on that I will opt for relying on my gel alone; I enjoy Biosilk Rock Hard Gelee (for ultra high hold) or LA Looks Sport gel (with high hold) for hot weather. If you live in Europe or Asia the L'oreal Invisihold gel is a good dupe for LA looks sport in terms of amount of hold. Or if you want something high end the Original Moxie Hold Up Serum is the bomb and has lots of good ingredients for your hair. If the gel leaves your hair a little crunchy, just give your hair a good scrunch when dry. The gel cast really helps prevent frizz and poofing!





Hair *usually* frizzes because of dryness so you can't forget about moisturizing in the summer. Not to mention the sun and swimming can take a toll on your hair, which I'll get to in a minute. One of the best steps to prevent frizz is a good leave in. My hair loves both the As I Am and Kinky Curly Knot Today leave ins, which are water based and really leave my hair feeling like seaweed. I also like Beauty Without Cruelty's leave in conditioner from iHerb.com if I can't get my hands on those two. Beyond that good regular conditioner is really important like Sally's Beauty Generic Matrix Biolage Conditioning Balm or the slightly lighter Andalou Naturals Citrus Conditioner (again from iHerb.com). And when my hair really needs an infusion of moisture I use my Hair Therapy heat wrap with Curl Junkie Curl Rehab deep treatment.


It's also worth mentioning that I apply A LOT more of my products in the summer---for all of them. The extra moisture and hold really helps keep my hair from frizzing out. I also check the dew point on AccuWeather on my phone, which is an excellent measure of how much moisture is in the air (aka humidity) and helps me know which products to reach for.



Surf and Turf Protection

So you wanna go swimming but you don't want the chemicals to affect your hair. And did you know you can get very real heat damage from the sun?? The good thing is that these are easy to prevent.

When I go swimming in chlorine, I follow up my swim with a shampoo with a sulfate free shampoo like any from Shea Moisture or the Boots DermaCare Gentle Shampoo. Then I use a deep conditioner or a really good regular conditioner (mentioned previously). This usually leaves my hair pretty happy. BUT if you want to prevent any chlorine seeping into your hair, you can apply leave in, water, and oil before swimming. This is probably more necessary for frequent swimmers; as an occasional swimmer and more of a pro-tanner I don't feel the need to do the preventative step but it is a good tip. If you spend time sunning, you'll also be letting the moisturizing products work their way into your hair even better.

Lastly if you go swimming in a lake or the sea, don't worry too much about clarifying your hair. The sea salt will actually give you a natural curl boost, so it's fine to avoid washing it out completely with shampoo. But do be sure to follow up your dip in the ocean with a good conditioner. And if you're spending a lot of time in the sun, invest in a cute sun hat or a bandana to cover your hair. There are some products with sunscreen in them (benozophenone in the ingredients) such as LA looks sport gel, but covering your hair is by far the best way to protect it from the sun.

Please leave any questions or comments below. What are your favorite summer products and what do YOU change?

Have a great summer!

Wishing you lots of good hair days,
Sarah @:-)

11.14.2014

Giveaway: Silky Cocoons and Pillowcases!



Hello lovelies! Welcome to the giveaway post. Here are some more details about the prizes.


1st set
Charmeuse Satin Giraffe Pink/Brown for Longer Hair Cocoon and Standard Pillowcase
















2nd set
Charmeuse Satin Giraffe Pink/Brown 20” diameter Cocoon and Standard Pillowcase
















              A Silky Cocoon bonnet is made of charmeuse satin fabric with a approx. 1 ¼“ wide soft knit band attached to provide a soft grip when worn. Band can be tied from 20 – 24” with a tab to secure bonnet back without the use of elastic. Protect your hair from frizz, breakage and dryness. The lightweight material provides a silky cocoon for your hair to nestle and emerge anew. These are handmade originals with attention to detail and most importantly comfort. Giraffe pink/brown charmeuse satin is similar to doubled faced satin meaning satin is woven with a glossy surface on both sides. This item does not require a lining.Bonnet, Band & Pillowcase 100% polyester. All seams are sewn using a French seam. A French seam is a seam stitched first on the right side and then turned in and stitched on the wrong side so that the raw edges are enclosed in the seam.

Care Instructions
Hand wash or machine wash on delicate in cold water with mild detergent and line dry.

THIS GIVEAWAY IS OPEN INTERNATIONALLY.

        If you don't win the giveaway and have your heart set on one of her bonnets feel free to visit the Silky Cocoon shop.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

Wishing you all a good hair day,
Sarah @:-) 

<a href="http://www.bloglovin.com/blog/5229065/?claim=s7b2gxpp2ce">Follow my blog with Bloglovin</a>

8.03.2014

Giveaway: My Favorite Curly Stylers!

Hi guys! Thank you for all your support. Below is the rafflecopter widget where you can enter the giveaway! This is open in the US only. My apologies to my followers that live outside of the US.



a Rafflecopter giveaway

Thank you for entering! Good luck! May the raffles be ever in your favor.

Wishing you all a good hair day,

Sarah @:-) 

7.07.2014

The Curly Girl Method: Ingredients "Cheat" List | El Metodo Curly Girl: Lista de Ingredientes

(Mira debajo para la version en espanol.)

Hello blog readers! Today someone messaged me asking if there was a list somewhere of ingredients for following the Curly Girl method. The only place this list used to be before was a video description, but I decided to leave it here, so it's a bit easier to read and bookmark. For more information on the Curly Girl method, check out some of the videos I've done or wikiHow.

How to follow the curly girl method:


Please watch the addendum video for more information and clarification about sulfates and silicones:




Detailed page that explains the method in detail, with more tips and tricks for curly hair: http://www.wikihow.com/Follow-the-Curly-Girl-Method-for-Curly-Hair

Silicones found in hair products*:
Bisaminopropyl dimethicone
Amodimethicone
Amodimethicone (and) Trideceth-12 (and) Cetrimonium Chloride (combined together)
Behenoxy Dimethicone
Cetearyl methicone
Cetyl Dimethicone
Cyclomethicone
Cyclopentasiloxane
Dimethicone
Dimethiconol
Stearoxy Dimethicone
Stearyl Dimethicone
Trimethylsilylamodimethicone
Lauryl methicone copolyol (water soluble)
Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Hydroxypropyl Polysiloxane (water soluble)
Dimethicone Copolyol (water soluble)
PEG-Dimethicone, or any other 'cone with "PEG-" in front (water soluble)

*Silicones noted as "water soluble" are fine to use on this method and will wash out with just water and conditioner.

Others
You should also avoid castor oil, mineral oil, and waxes.

Sulfates
Alkylbenzene sulfonates
Ammonium laureth sulfate
Ammonium lauryl sulfate
Ammonium Xylenesulfonate
Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate
Sodium cocoyl sarcosinate
Sodium laureth sulfate
Sodium lauryl sulfate
Sodium lauryl sulfoacetate
Sodium myreth sulfate
Sodium Xylenesulfonate
TEA-dodecylbenzenesulfonate
Ethyl PEG-15 cocamine sulfate
Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate

Gentle cleansers that are fine to use:
Cocamidopropyl betaine
Coco betaine
Cocoamphoacetate
Cocoamphodipropionate
Disodium cocoamphodiacetate
Disodium cocoamphodipropionate
Lauroamphoacetate
Sodium cocoyl isethionate

Fatty alcohols - ok to use:
Behenyl alcohol
Cetearyl alcohol
Cetyl alcohol
Isocetyl alcohol
Isostearyl alcohol
Lauryl alcohol
Myristyl alcohol
Stearyl alcohol
C30-50 Alcohols
Lanolin alcohol

Drying alcohols to avoid:
Denat. alcohol
SD alcohol 40
Witch hazel
Isopropanol
ethanol
SD alcohol
Propanol
Propyl alcohol
Isopropyl alcohol

From "ingredients commonly found in hair products":
http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/curl-products/ingredients-commonly-found-in-hair-care-products

This is not a comprehensive list and is not intended to be that way. Usually google can tell you more about an ingredient if you can't find it here! Happy product shopping!

Wishing you all a good hair day,
Sarah @:-)




______________________________________________________________________
Hola lectores del blog! Hoy una chica me ha preguntado si exista una lista de ingredients para seguir el metodo curly girl. Antes, solo existaba en la descripcion del video, pero decidi dejar la lista aqui, porque es mas facil leer asi. Para mas informacion sobre el metodo Curly Girl, mira mis videos o es.wikiHow.com.

Pagina detallada que explica el método, con mas consejos y trucos para el cabello rizado (en español, claro):
http://es.wikihow.com/seguir-el-método-Curly-Girl-para-cabello-rizado

Como seguir el metodo curly girl:
(para espanol, usa los subtiulos)


 Video adicional sobre el método (sin subtitulos)


Siliconas en los productos de pelo*:
Bisaminopropyl dimethicone
Amodimethicone
Amodimethicone (and) Trideceth-12 (and) Cetrimonium Chloride (combined together)
Behenoxy Dimethicone
Cetearyl methicone
Cetyl Dimethicone
Cyclomethicone
Cyclopentasiloxane
Dimethicone
Dimethiconol
Stearoxy Dimethicone
Stearyl Dimethicone
Trimethylsilylamodimethicone
Lauryl methicone copolyol (water soluble)
Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Hydroxypropyl Polysiloxane (water soluble)
Dimethicone Copolyol (water soluble)
PEG-Dimethicone, or any other 'cone with "PEG-" in front (water soluble)

*Silconas notadas como "water soluble" (soluble en agua) son perfectos para este método y se van con solo agua y acondicionador.

Otros ingredientes:
También debes evitar aceite castor, aceite mineral, y ceras.

Sulfatos:
Alkylbenzene sulfonates
Ammonium laureth sulfate
Ammonium lauryl sulfate
Ammonium Xylenesulfonate
Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate
Sodium cocoyl sarcosinate
Sodium laureth sulfate
Sodium lauryl sulfate
Sodium lauryl sulfoacetate
Sodium myreth sulfate
Sodium Xylenesulfonate
TEA-dodecylbenzenesulfonate
Ethyl PEG-15 cocamine sulfate
Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate

 Limpiadores suaves que son buenos:
Cocamidopropyl betaine
Coco betaine
Cocoamphoacetate
Cocoamphodipropionate
Disodium cocoamphodiacetate
Disodium cocoamphodipropionate
Lauroamphoacetate
Sodium cocoyl isethionate

Alcoholes humectantes - buenos:

Behenyl alcohol
Cetearyl alcohol
Cetyl alcohol
Isocetyl alcohol
Isostearyl alcohol
Lauryl alcohol
Myristyl alcohol
Stearyl alcohol
C30-50 Alcohols
Lanolin alcohol

Alcoholes que secan el pelo - malos:

Denat. alcohol
SD alcohol 40
Witch hazel
Isopropanol
ethanol
SD alcohol
Propanol
Propyl alcohol
Isopropyl alcohol


Esta lista fue constuido con la ayuda de esta lista en naturallycurly.com:
http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/curl-products/ingredients-commonly-found-in-hair-care-products

No es una lista completa. Google te puede ayudar con otros ingredients. :)

Que tengais buen dia de pelo,

Sarah @:-)

7.03.2014

Relaxers, Unprofessionalism, and Wavy Hair: Kathleen B. on the Natural Hair Debate

An internet friend of mine, Kathleen B, wrote this about the CurlyNikki feature and the use of the phrase "natural hair." I thought this was written so eloquently, and is exactly what I am trying to get across about this controversy.

"This is my take as a white girl with natural, 2c hair: I have white privilege due to my skin color. I have not experienced discrimination or institutional racism due to my race. This is unearned and undeserved and unfair, and I am aware of it. I in no way consider my individual struggle with learning to accept and care for my hair anywhere near on the same scale as universal, centuries-long struggle black women have had, and I am aware that black women struggle from double discrimination on the hair matter, as they face discrimination on the basis of hair AND skin color, and often bad comments about their hair have an element of racism to them (i.e., a white girl with curly, natural hair is a lot less likely to be expelled from school than a black girl is). 




I will say this as a white woman: white girls are almost always taught growing up that DAILY shampooing (or at the absolute least, every other day) with a harsh shampoo is mandatory; if you don't do it, you are considered utterly filthy and unhygienic. This especially the case when we have straight-haired mothers, which a lot of us, including me, do. We are assumed to have oily, straight or slightly wavy hair, and the lion's share of products in the mainstream/aka "white" section of the hair care aisle in the drugstore (and I do HATE that "ethnic" label for the products considered to be "black" - it's innaccurate and predicated on the idea that the default/normative person in our society is white, and often that section is far smaller than the "white" section even in locations, such as the one I live in, where most of the population is African-American) are formulated for oily and thin hair (tons of use of the word "volumizing" on the packaging, etc.). The stuff (Herbal Essences, I'm talking to you!) that claims to be for wavy, curly, and/or frizzy hair usually have the same exact ingredients as the stuff for straight hair, and the same "lather, rinse, repeat" instruction as the straight hair stuff, i.e., it's just marketing and in no way teaches us to take proper care of our hair).




It was a revelation when I discovered the Curly Girl Method - I was NOT dirty if I didn't shampoo daily, there were products and techniques that worked for my hair! Prior to CG, I HATED shampooing my hair bc it would be dry and puffy, and by the time it wasn't it was considered too dirty to go outside with. The marketing and product placement practices in the beauty and drugstore industries are such that I didn't know shea butter products wouldn't weigh down my hair, for instance...once I learned to check ingredients rather than marketing/product placement/what skin color the lady who owned the company or was in the ads had/etc., my hair looked and felt SO much better. Shea Moisture products in my area are sometimes shelved in the hippie/organic section, and sometimes in the "ethnic" section. Because of this marketing and product placement, it had never occurred to me to read labels for ingredients until I learned as an adult who had done my own research to do so - I was just "supposed to" use the stuff in "my" section. So, we are improperly educated about the proper care of our own hair. 





Regarding the "unprofessional" label - of COURSE it doesn't happen with the frequency, or for the same reason, it does for black women. I am aware of this, and know my experience is not comparable. That said, it sure HAS happened to me, and more than once. I will cite some examples - I went to an employment agency, and was told that my resume was awesome, and then immediately told that I should double-check in a mirror before my interviews and make sure to " tame my frizzy hair"" before meeting potential employers. I also had a coworker CONSTANTLY make a "friendly" suggestion to "do something about those split ends" - by which she was actually referring to what she considered frizz (for some reason, a lot of ppl. think "split ends" means the top of your head???!!!) and kept telling me about straight people hair products she thought would work for that - silicones, of course.


A brazillian blowout

And I did use expensive, damaging, salon chemical relaxers on my hair (again, not nearly as long or for the same reasons as black women, or under nearly as much social pressure). So yeah, I've had issues with my hair due to the ignorance and social pressure of straight-haired people, and think I have plenty of personal reasons to consider it "natural," even though my struggle has not been the same, or as difficult, as that of black women. So if I see a blog, or forum, or guru with curly hair, almost always, I find information and product recs that DO apply to my hair, even if my skin color is different. So yeah, I'm natural...and so are curly and kinky haired women." - Kathleen B.

7.01.2014

My CurlyNikki Feature, Natural Hair, and Race: Can a White Girl be Part of the #NaturalHairMovement?

I'm writing this blog post so I can respond in a lengthy manner to all the @replies, comments, and messages I have received. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions. I don't expect everyone to agree with me.  I'm sorry that I have hurt and offended so many, as the post was not intended to be offensive. 

A little while ago I saw a post on the CurlTalk forums on NaturallyCurly.com asking for people to submit to be featured on the CurlyNikki blog. I love reading CurlyNikki, so I thought I would go ahead and do an interview. I scrolled down a few posts on the site, and saw most featured African American women, but didn't think much of it. And I saw that the site description didn't seem to be specific to African Americans, so I sent in the interview. A few of the questions didn't apply to me very well.
  •  "Were you a transitioner or a Big Chopper? What was your journey like?
    I’ve had my hair in its natural state for my whole life."

My naturally curly hair
 
  • "Had you always embraced your texture? Nope! Prior to the beginning of high school, my hair was constantly up in a bun or a braid. I was around 14 when I started learning how to style and care for my curly hair. Beyond learning the techniques, I also had to accept my hair for what it was…voluminous, temperamental, and very curly! Learning to wear my curls also helped my adolescent self to gain confidence. When people started complimenting my hair it was unsettling at first because of my introverted and shy nature, but eventually it grew into a source of self-esteem for me."

My hair in it's perma-braided state


Technically I have always had my natural texture, but I just haven't embraced it. It's impossible for me to answer questions about transitioning and big chopping. These questions were provided by my NaturallyCurly.com contact. And as you can see, my hair has affected my self-esteem a lot, but it has not been a huge struggle in my life. 


My triangle hair as a kid, which drew bullying and prompted me to always bun or braid my hair.

Flash forward a week or so, and I was featured on the site.  There were a lot of positive responses, and I want to thank those people for their kind words. But there were also many comments opposing the feature on CurlyNikki, facebook, and Twitter. Many felt that a white woman should not be featured on CurlyNikki.

From the CurlyNikki comment section:


  • "Why do we need to make spaces for people who already have representation? Always so willing to accommodate and yet always being less accommodated. Making spaces for white women in the limited spaces made for women of colour isn’t going to change anything."
  •  "Still shaking my head at the black women on here defending this mess. Y'all are absolutely pathetic. I don't want to hear any of you complaining when white women take over Essence and they change "Black Girls Rock" to "All Girls Rock". We basically have nothing for ourselves, so we carve out a little space of our own in the beauty world and sellouts are ready and willing to hand this precious space over to white women. It's amazing. And sad."

And the replies continued to come in after I tweeted and posted about the backlash: "I applied to be featured on @CurlyNikki because I like to read her blog. Her posts are useful for all types of people. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but I don't straighten daily, use keratin, relaxers etc so I call my hair natural! Those that are claiming I shouldn't have been on the blog because I'm white are being exclusive. The word natural has existed for a long time. I would like to see all women embrace their natural hair, regardless of race or texture."

Here are replies to this post on my Facebook page:

  • "You are free to call your hair whatever you want, but seeking inclusion in a space that was created to allow black women the opportunity to buck conventional ideals of western beauty standards, learn to accept and embrace themselves despite the images that we see in the media, and gain an understanding for our hair despite having few external examples to learn from, is the real issue. You cannot ignore the politics that exist surrounding black hair. Black children are being sent home from school for wearing their hair in afros. Black men have to wear their hair shaved low otherwise it's deemed unprofessional, and black women are told that the way that our hair grows out of our scalps is inappropriate for professional settings. These are real challenges that we uniquely face and the natural hair movement was created in part to begin to dismantle them. So please, call your hair whatever you wish, but quit seeking inclusion in a space that was created to challenge the very privilege that you apparently don't even realize that you enjoy."
  •   "No one cares about you being white. People feel that you co-opted something that is inherently black. Black women have been told for centuries that their hair is ugly/nappy/unkempt/unacceptable/unprofessional in it's natural state. They need to fix it to be accepted. They need to damage it for it to be beautiful. For you to come over all chipper and say, 'I just took my hair out of a bun and stopped braiding it. YAY! Natural now!' is a slap in the face to every black woman who has been told (and is still being told) that her hair is ugly/nappy/unkempt/unacceptable/unprofessional simply because it isn't wavy or straight."
  
An article on Ebony.com:
  • "Community is important. Black spaces are important, and in the era of self-proclaimed “New Blacks” and the gentrification of both Black popular culture and neighborhoods, they are increasingly rare. So when the sacred sanctity of Black Girl Space was violated via the inclusion of a White woman on a natural hair blog, it should come as no surprise that a number of people were disappointed. And I'll admit, I was one of them."
  •  "To be fair to [Nikki] Walton , her site is not about Black hair or Black power. The "About" page states 'CurlyNikki.com was created to serve as an online 'hair therapy session' for those struggling to embrace their naturally curly hair.' Her mission is clear: affirming those who wish to embrace a certain hair texture."

I'm not denying my privilege. And I'm not trying to upstage other women's struggles, or erase the connotations of the natural hair movement with African American women.It 's horrible that little girls are suspended from school because of their hairstyle; it's awful to think that women are told their natural hair is not professional. The military shouldn't have a place in telling women that styles like braids and locs are not permitted. These things all happened, but it doesn't mean other women of other races don't struggle because of their hair as well.

But I've been calling my hair natural for years. Lots of girls of different races who have looser textures struggle with accepting their natural hair as well. My story is not a story of a large struggle, and I tried not to paint it that way, but I have subscribers who come to me after they've relaxed or straightened their hair for years! It's life-changing and uplifting when those girls learn to embrace their natural hair... To me natural hair is about hair, not race or texture. I understand that natural hair is often associated with black women, but other women have a claim to the term as well. The term is not specific to any race.

From UrbanDictionary.com:
Natural hair: Your natural hair is when your hair is in the state that you were born with. 
 
As well, CurlyNikki is not a website exclusive to African American topics or hair care. It is not a space solely for African American women. CurlyNikki has even said in the past that she doesn't mind white women being a part of #TeamNatural

From her "About Me":
  • "CurlyNikki.com was created to serve as an online “hair therapy session” for those struggling to embrace their naturally curly hair. It not only serves as an educational tool, but as a platform for each of you to share your experiences, frustrations, and triumphs of being Naturally Glamorous."

I am not asking for inclusion into a blog or space created for black women. I am not trying to downplay others struggles. Just because one person's struggle may be greater than another's, does not mean the other person's did not happen or did not affect them negatively. Women from all races  and ethnicities (white, hispanic, indian, middle eastern, etc.) struggle with wearing their hair naturally, even if those struggles are not comparable to those of black women.  The phrase "natural hair" is not exclusive to black women. I've heard it used to describe many types of hair for years on the internet. I receive messages from women all over the world asking for help with caring for their hair; others have relaxed or fried their hair to the point that it doesn't curl anymore. All these women struggle with caring for and embracing their natural hair. I know not everyone agrees about how myself and others choose to define "natural hair", or that I was featured on CurlyNikki, but these are my opinions on the matter.

I feel that my feature on CurlyNikki has caused a huge backlash, and the issue has been blown out of proportion. As women we associate a lot of thing with our hair: our race, our ethnicity, our identity, and our beauty. Many women (of different races) with textured hair have been made to conform to beauty standards of straight, silky hair, when their natural hair is so beautiful without any alterations. But
at the end of the day, it's just hair. As women we should lift each other up, and avoid creating divisions amongst ourselves over  hair. To quote  Afro-Latina vlogger Melshary Arias, "The has NOTHING to do with skin color but women embracing their natural hair."  To me, this is the true aim of the natural hair movement--women embracing their textured, curly, wavy, coily, or kinky hair and loving it.




Please share this post on Social Media outlets. I do not have as big a readership as CurlyNikki or Ebony.com, and some word of mouth help for getting my response out there would be great. Thanks!

 [I've received a large volume of responses on Twitter that I do not have time to reply to. This is my response. I can't reply to everyone and won't be able to following this blog post either.]

Update: CurlyNikki has responded to the Ebony.com article.

Note: Insulting comments will be removed. Please keep things civil and discuss the issues without personally insulting me or others. Thanks!